" It was an honor and a privilege to be part of the first cohort of visiting scholars at the James Weldon Johnson Institute.  The genuine commitment to interdisciplinary study combined with the rich resources of Atlanta and Emory University made it an ideal place to conduct research on the black freedom movement.  Every scholar should have the good fortune to work in such an intellectually stimulating and supportive environment.  This year will stay with me for a long time to come."
 
  Robbie Lieberman,
Southern Illinois University Carbondale
 

PLEASE NOTE: THE JAMES WELDON JOHNSON INSTITUTE IS NO LONGER ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR 2014-15. DETAILS OF THE 2015-16 APPLICATION PROCESS WILL BE POSTED AS THEY BECOME AVAILABLE.

National Call for Applications
The James Weldon Johnson Institute of Emory University invites applications for its Visiting Fellows Program whose focus is upon the modern civil rights movement. Supported by a generous grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Visiting Fellows Program provides up to five fellowships for both junior and senior scholars and their career equivalents each academic year. We welcome applications from scholars in the humanities, the humanistic social sciences and law. We are interested in research projects in American Studies, African American Studies, English, Ethnic Studies, Gay and Lesbian Studies, History, Law, Music and Women’s Studies that examine the origins, evolution, impact and legacy of the modern civil rights movement from 1905, or the rise of the Niagara Movement, to the present. We also support research projects that examine the civil rights movement and its points of intersection with other social justice movements such as the Women’s Movement, the Lesbian, Gay, Bi-Sexual, Transgendered Movement, and the Human Rights Movement. Fellows will each teach one course in the spring semester. The deadline for applications is March 1, 2014. Visiting Fellows will be in residence at Emory’s Johnson Institute for the academic year 2014-2015. Candidates must hold a Ph. D. at the time of application.

Visiting Fellows 2013-2014
Visiting Fellows Archive

Program Structure
Supported by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Visiting Fellows Program is the core program of the Johnson Institute. With its focus upon the modern civil rights movement from 1905 to the present, the Visiting Fellows Program is the first and only residential program of its kind in the nation. Within the framework of the Visiting Fellows Program, the modern civil rights movement is defined as beginning with the establishment of the Niagara Movement of 1905, a movement that defined itself in opposition to the policies of Booker T. Washington. The program supports new Ph.Ds, faculty members, and independent scholars with a distinguished record of research and undergraduate or graduate teaching in the humanities, the humanistic social sciences and law on the modern civil rights movement. The Visiting Fellows Program seeks to foster new research that examines the origins, evolution, impact and legacy of the modern civil rights movement as well as its impact upon other social justice movements in the United States and abroad. These social movements include but are not limited to the Women’s Movement, the Gay and Lesbian Movement and the Human Rights Movement. The Johnson Institute is committed to recruiting only the best and most promising scholars in civil rights. The expectation is that visiting scholars will complete a major work that will assume the form of a monograph or other equally substantial forms of scholarship.

Beyond the Johnson Institute visiting scholars will have two institutional homes: Emory’s School of Law and one of five sponsoring departments. These departments are African American Studies, English, History, Music and the Graduate Institute of the Liberal Arts. In designing the program, the leadership of the Johnson Institute considered carefully the complex and special needs of visiting scholars; a desire to maximize their productivity; and the opportunity to effectively use the resources resident at Emory University and in Atlanta, widely recognized as the spiritual home of the modern civil rights movement.

Faculty Hosts
During the period of the residency, visiting scholars will be paired with faculty hosts from the five sponsoring departments and the School of Law. Faculty hosts constitute an important source of support and information for visiting scholars beyond the Johnson Institute. Faculty hosts are senior Emory faculty members who will work collaboratively with the director of the Johnson Institute in order to make the residencies of the visiting scholars productive and meaningful. Faculty hosts are the liaison between the Johnson Institute and colleagues in sponsoring departments as well as the School of Law who share the research interests of visiting scholars. Faculty hosts contribute to the realization of some of the important goals of the Visiting Fellows Program.

Teaching
While the Johnson Institute remains committed to supporting new research and scholarship on the modern civil rights movement, it is equally committed to the creation of new opportunities for learning for undergraduate and graduate students in this field. With the support and cooperation of the sponsoring departments and the School of Law, visiting scholars will teach one undergraduate or graduate course during the period of their residency. All matters related to the advertisement, cross-listing, and the evaluation of courses will be administered by the sponsoring departments and the School of Law.

Monthly Colloquia
The monthly colloquia are the dynamic framework for the presentation of research by visiting scholars. The objective of this structure is to cultivate the widest possible audience for the monthly colloquia, and to foster a multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary dialogue. Equally important, this structure seeks to foster the creation of a community of scholars that includes the visiting scholars, the faculty and students of the sponsoring departments, the School of Law, along with other visiting scholars in residence at Emory University.

Faculty Seminar on Civil Rights
In order to strengthen and expand the community of scholars constituted by the Visiting Fellows Program, the Johnson Institute also sponsors a Faculty Seminar on Civil Rights. While the monthly colloquia are the framework within which visiting scholars present their research, the Faculty Seminar on Civil Rights is the forum in which they receive even deeper grounding in the field of civil rights. Meeting once during the period of the residency, the faculty seminar is the site for the presentation of perspectives and research on the modern civil rights movement by faculty in Emory College, the Candler School of Theology, and the School of Law. Presenters also include scholars beyond Emory who have shaped the discourse and research on civil rights through their scholarship. The faculty seminar also features presentations by practitioners and leaders within the modern civil rights movement. Beyond serving the vital function of enhancing their knowledge base, the Faculty Seminar on Civil Rights is yet another means of introducing visiting scholars to the many resources of Emory University. The seminar also fosters the creation of a broad community of scholars engaged in research on civil rights. 
     
  Eligibility  
 
- Ph.D.
- U.S. citizenship or permanent resident status as of the application deadline.
- We do not support the completion of doctoral dissertations nor projects in creative writing. Scholars at the level of assistant professors may apply for one grant renewal. When applying for the renewal, scholars will compete for a fellowship among the new pool of applicants.
 
     
  Award   
 
- $60,000 for full Professor and equivalent with benefits
- $40,000 for Associate Professor and equivalent with benefits
- $30,000 for Assistant Professor and equivalent with benefits
- Period of Residency: one academic year
- Application deadline: March 1, 2014
 
     
  Application
Download Application Form
Application materials are to be emailed to jwji@emory.edu by March 1, 2014. A complete application packeage includes:
 
 
- a completed application form
- research proposal (not to exceed 1,000 words)
- a curriculum vita 
- three letters of recommendation emailed to jwji@emory.edu
 
James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race & Difference
Suite 6-223
1599 Clifton Road, NE
Emory University
Atlanta, GA 30322
   
 
   
 
 
  Visiting Fellows 2013-2014  
 
 
 

Stephen A. Berrey
Assistant Professor of American Culture & History
University of Michigan
Project Title: The Jim Crow Routine: Everyday Performances of
Race and the End of Segregation in Mississippi

Anastasia Curwood
Assistant Professor of African American & Diaspora Studies
Vanderbilt University
Project Title: Aim High: The Life and Times of Shirley Chisholm

Moon-Kie Jung
Associate Professor of Sociology
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Project Title: Denaturalizing Racism

Sherie M. Randolph
Assistant Professor of History and AfroAmerican & African Studies
University of Michigan
Project Title: Black Feminist Radical: Florynce "Flo" Kennedy

Caroline H. Yang
Assistant Professor of Asian American Studies
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Project Title: Reconstruction's Labor: The Chinese Worker in American Literature after Slavery

 
     
     
 
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